Comics – good or bad for children?

(The first three parts of this series on Books and Reading can be read at  I, II and III)

Who doesn’t like comics? Actually you’d be surprised to know that there are many who don’t. The thing about comics is that one can’t be indifferent to them. One loves them or hates them or looks at them with disdain. But indifferent? No way!

What is it about comics that elicits such extreme responses? And why are they considered bad for children by many? First let us look at the good points:

  • Like Picture books, comics tell the story in pictures – lot more pictures and so are interesting for children.
  • Large chunks of text can be intimidating to children who have just begun reading by themselves.
  • They help children develop reading skills and learn new words even if some might be difficult. They develop their vocabulary by reading words in the context of the narrative.
  • Boring topics can be made interesting and easy to understand by breaking them down into smaller illustrated bites.
  • For many children it is the first step towards reading books without illustrations.
  • Classics and epics can also be easily understood in the comic book format.

And the bad points?

  • Children tend to believe that the comic book heroes are real and try to emulate them with disastrous results as had happened after the Superman and Spiderman series were launched.
  • The language can be inappropriate for smaller children with bad grammar and swear words.
  • It is not considered good ‘literature’.
  • The idolization of negative characters can be bad for the psyche of the child.
  • Action comics with too much violence and horror comics with their gory and gruesome visuals can lead to nightmares or worse.
  • While some might consider the superheroes series as being good, for in them the good triumphs over evil, others might not agree. Even the seemingly harmless and innocent Archie comics have come under feminist ire as being bad for girls And some find negative tones in the Tom and Jerry comics too.

Not too long ago, comic strips were part of the daily papers. One of the most popular comic strips, Calvin and Hobbs, at the height of its popularity, was reportedly syndicated by nearly 2400 newspapers worldwide. When I was growing up, newspapers serialized comics making one wait for the next day’s paper to read what happened next. Today except for some regional papers they are relegated to the city sections and supplements or dispensed with altogether.

Comic books as we know them came into being in the 19th century. According to Wiki, Histoire de M. Vieux Bois by Swiss caricaturist Rodolphe Topffer was the first comic book published in 1828. Its English translation The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck, was published in 1841 in England. Comic books have come a long way since then and we have even graphic novels for adults, though I have not read any.

(The history of comics and comic books can be read here and here.)

When comics had first hit the stands in the West and parents were buying them by the armloads for their own and their children’s reading pleasure, there came warning notes from psychologists, notable among whom was Fredric Wertham who, in his book Seduction of the Innocent, published in 1954, argued that comic books exerted such negative influence on children that they were psychologically damaged for life. He also objected to the advertisements of firearms and such in these comics, which could work in an insidious way on the minds of children.

The major chunk of this genre is still monopolized by the superheroes including Superman, Batman, Spiderman and Supergirl, followed by action comics. Marvel Comics and DC Comics lead the bandwagon in these segments.

ACK

In India, the Times of India was the first to bring out comics with their Indrajal comics in the early ’60s, which featured Phantom, Mandrake, Rip Kirby and others. By the late ’60s, Uncle Pai (Anant Pai) had started Amar Chitra Katha, published by India Book House. He later launched Tinkle, a comic magazine for children. However, it was in the 70s and 80s that this industry saw a flurry of activity with Raj Comics, Diamond Comics and others entering the fray. However, apart from Amar Chitra Katha and Tinkle, the rest of the comics were Indianised versions of the western superheroes. Shaktiman, loosely based on Superman was a big hit and was even made into a TV serial later. Others included Parmanu, Super Commando Dhruv, Doga and Nagraj. Each of them had some super power and fought evil. Some, a la Superman were visitors from another planet. Among all these superheroes, Chacha Chaudhary stands apart with his own huge fan following, though even these comics had an alien in the form of Sabu! Pinki is another popular creation of Pran, the creator of CC.  The latest hero of children is Chota Bheem, but so far he is confined to the TV and DVDs.

My friends Harshal and Anuradha have pointed out in their comments that CB has already come out in the comic book form. Thanks you for the update!

Despite all the fears of comics being corrupting influences on children, haven’t we successfully graduated to books without having turned to a life of crime or becoming serial killers? And we still enjoy an Asterix, a Calvin and Hobbs, a MAD or Amar Chitra Katha. If you are anything like me, you’d pick up a Tinkle —  even at my age!

In fact, Amar Chitra Katha  has made readers out of at least two generations of Indian kids. Its Tinkle characters Suppandi, Tantri the Mantri and Shikari Shambhu have become household names. So much so that when their creator Uncle Pai  passed away a couple of years ago, lakhs of his readers mourned him. True, they might not have great literary value, but have for at least a couple of generations brought the myths, folk tales, epics, history and biographies within easy grasp of even primary school children.

And here is the something I had said I will share with you all.

Like many parents, I too had had my reservations about my children ending up only reading comics. While he was still in primary school, the elder one  devoured Amar Chitra Katha, Tinkle and other comics by the dozens and then kept re-reading and re-re-reading them much to my dismay. I started fretting that he would never be interested in books. There were a good many children’s books at home, but he wouldn’t pick them up unless nagged incessantly. I kept threatening to give away the comics if he didn’t read other books. He didn’t take me seriously. So one day, out of sheer exasperation I carried out the threat and gave away all the comics to the kids in the neighbourhood. I reasoned that since he couldn’t do without reading, he would pick up the books willy-nilly. He did.

In hindsight, it was the most callous thing to do to a ten-year-old and I felt lousy for having done it immediately after. Of course, I did buy comics for him after that and he got a new and better collection, but he never forgave me for my misplaced act of charity – and has not, till today. Come to think of it, I have not forgiven myself!

The younger one, as I had said in the previous post, got interested in reading thanks to Chacha Chaudhary comics. What I didn’t tell you was that he was around eight by then. Better late than never, right? And though I was not happy about his reading the English translations of these comics, I didn’t do the same mistake that I had done with the older one and held my peace. I am glad I did.

Even while telling stories and reading to your children, encourage them to read by themselves; take them to the children’s libraries in your city; take them to bookshops and allow them to browse at leisure. You can spend many an enjoyable hour in a good book shop and help them select books of their choice. The advantage of bookshops and libraries is that if you feel that the book is not right for their age or the language is bad, you can gently steer them away to another section. Again, it is important to start the exercise early in their life before they lose interest in reading or become too lazy to read.

And talking of libraries, a good librarian can kindle an interest in reading and help children fall in love with books. How do I know? Well that is matter for another post 🙂

…more

Images courtesy:

This page : http://www.redpatang.com. Homepage: http://www.mrgraymedia.co.uk

56 comments

  1. […] Comics – good or bad for children? […]

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  2. Nithin Suresh · · Reply

    Hi Zephyr!

    Nice Article about the influence of Comics on one’s Lyf.. It just transported me into my childhood days, when I used to devour Comics and other books in equal measure.. Was a great fan of Comics and other story books since I was very young.. Your post just made me Nostalgic about all those Wonderful Bygone Days, when Lyf was simple and free.. Chacha Choudhary, Shaktimaan, Kalia the Crow et all were a part and parcel of Lyf back then..

    This is your First blog that I am reading.. Will definitely jump to the other ones…

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    1. Nice to know you enjoyed the post and went back in time to relive your memories of comics and childhood, Nitin. Hope you enjoy the other posts too 🙂

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  3. Hi Zephyr, today I took a day off and caught up with all the posts. Yes story telling is an art because you have to stretch your imagination. You are also giving us anecdotes of your experiences in the form of stories and taking us back and the cycle of reminiscing starts.

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    1. Thanks Radha! It makes me feel good to know that you decided to spend a well earned rest day reading my blog posts 🙂 Did you tell your kids stories about your childhood? If you hadn’t done it when they were young, do it at least now. They really enjoy the escapades we had as children.

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  4. I have not been too much of a comics person when I was growing up. Did read those in newspapers and magazines but did not really read comic books except Chacha Chowdhury. My husband who loves reading Java books much more than fiction is a comics fans. Tintin, Asterix, Phantom. Calvin and Hobbes, ACK… He has read them all. He got me hooked to Asterix as owns the complete collection. And I see Sid loving both comics and books. Like you pointed out, I have not seen anyone not graduating onto books. And Gautam prefers picture books and comics to conventional reading. It is less taxing and easier for him to follow. I think comics are wonderful. Most of us would have not known our mythology without Amar Chitra Kathas.

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    1. Comics used to be expensive till ACK came into the market. And what a treasure trove it was! Gurdev seems to be a man after my reading heart 🙂 Anyone who invests in Asterix and other comics has to be a serious reader. Gautam will soon follow suit by reading the ACK. Get him the series in the subjject he is interested in.They have now classified them into various series and selling entire sets. It will be a worthwhile investment.

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      1. We have loads of ACK at home. All bought when Sid was younger, an entire volume of Mahabharata as well. There is a treasure trove awaiting Gautam. Did I tell you that we have got a bookcase only for Sid? 🙂

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        1. If they are in piles, let him pick him pick one. We never know what interests a child unless he knows the options. A pile of ACK will be confusing and maybe he is not interested in reading the Mahabharata or the epics. So find out what he likes.

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  5. As someone said in an earlier comment, there are two sides to everything! Same with comics!

    Somehow, neither of my children read comics much- they preferred books. Very easy ones at first, of course. On the other hand, I used to read comics a lot when I was young!

    Nice story about trying to control what your son read- most parents have tried something like that at some point, I think. 🙂

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    1. Looks like kids these days are more into animated cartoons, which then come out in the form of comics, as is the case with Chota Bheem. Yes, our generation lapped up all those comics for they were new to us then. I hope other parents weren’t so harsh with their kids as I had been with mine. It leaves an indelible mark on their memories 😦

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  6. This Generation is more about Harry Potter, Game of Thrones and Japanese Anime.

    But when I wanted my daughter to read the Mahabharata and Ramayana, I looked for comic book versions. And I wish we still had Amar Chitra Katha to familiarize our kids with our cultural heritage.

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    1. ACK comics are still there. And more than the children, I think we grandparents need it more. For with the kids going for all those stuff you have written about and more, we at least need to keep ourselves informed about the epics and myths of our country 🙂

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  7. G.N. BALAKRISHNAN. · · Reply

    There are two sides to the coin. There is also good and evil, living cheek by Jowl , and every thing depends upon the proportion of these elements in every day life. To discard COMICS altogether as evil is as unwise as to patronize it. If one is determined to go astray, there is no way stopping him from pursuing his objective. As parents, we have only to guide them properly and ensure that they assimilate the good in them and avoid the evil. In today’s environment, where, TV serials and movies are doings enough damage to demoraluse youngsters, COMICS appear to be a better alternative, as there is Hooke of the children switching over to healthier form of reading after the initial excitement of the comics.

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    1. Right! It is always best to tread the middle path. As you say comics are comparatively the better option since the violence in them is only in print and not brought alive by moving images that leave a longer lasting impact on youngsters’ minds. Also serious readers slowly shift out of the comics phase to begin reading other books. Good to see you here, GNB!

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  8. Raajee. · · Reply

    I personally feel comic books as a positive and harmless activity for kids. Children love them. Plus, graphics can potentially make children who were once reluctant readers get excited about reading in general.

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    1. Ah, endorsed by a teacher 🙂

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  9. I have one problem with Indian comics like chhota bheem, that they are always about fighting and show cruelty and gore…whereas abroad Pepa pig is all about manners, etiquettes and teaches a lot thru its series..

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    1. Comics come in all forms. I would say a comic book depicting violence is still better than kids watching them on TV, won’t you?

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  10. My parents had the same reservations about comics as you did, but luckily for them, we used to read books as avidly as we did comics, so I guess they didn’t have to impose any strict rules on us! My kids too are equally fond of Calvin and Hobbes and Garfield, as they are to Harry Potter or other chapter books!

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    1. Actually had I left him to his own devices, he would have sooner than later picked up books. He was so fond of reading. but I had to show my parenting skills 😦 Great to know that both the A’s read books and comics in equal measure. The best thing is to leave them alone to evolve into good readers. I applied this to the second one and soon he was reading books I found heavy!

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  11. As I commented in your earlier post, in our house, most of the people were book worms. I used to buy Amar chitra Katha 2 at a time for the 2 sons. I used to read them out when they were very very small. The elder one used to repeat the story just by placing his finger on one colum and repeat the dialogue which was written there .. he didn’t know to read though. Just grasped from me. Then ater they grew up a little, whenever all of us went to the library, they were asking me to ‘browse’ for a long time and they used to finish off reading comics one by one there itself! Then bring some home too!

    Whenever we came to Chennai from Banglore, they used to go with my brother to the bookshop, buy a few books, come home, read and return saying that they had already read them and wanted a different one! The man knew my brother and laughing gave new books! It was fun for the children.

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  12. I use to love comics , I mean i still do but i just done get time to read them anymore .. I am sure back home Istill have all my collection of phantom, tarzan, tintin and all .. I hope my mom has not thrown them away in RADDI 😦 .. as they are probably worth a LOT of money now ..

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    1. I do hope your mom has not thrown those comics out. If you loved them so much she might not have, unless like me, she gave them away. But then I am sure you will not mind it, will you like my son did. But he had been a kid, and was justifiably upset.

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      1. grondmaster · · Reply

        Even as a kid I knew the value of the books – my parents drilled it into me. Both avid readers, they never would discard books, they always handed those we weren’t reading someone else for them to read. I continue doing so.

        Even my MBA textbooks – those that I had discarded, my father went to the local bookstore to check if they were taking those books for seconds sales, gave it to them so that some other students coule learn from them. The money he got was of no value, as we have been giving away textbooks for 3 generations now. Always.

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        1. Discard books? No way! Give them away, yes. We have given away more books than I care to remember. Children’s books were given away with the strict admonition that they should be passed on after the child outgrew them. Uncle wouldn’t let me sell any book. Even the comics which I had taken away from the older one was distributed.

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  13. I enjoyed comics, still do… but they always were a stop gap, when I didn’t have another book to start on or when I had those 15 minutes to spare between study times… now I read them whenever my mind is drained out after reading a slightly serious book or I have written enough words to take my eyes off the computer for a while 🙂
    About comics for children, i think as long as we know what to give at which age.. and most importantly when to give and how to control it, it should be ok… about the control, i know its easier said than done 😛

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    1. As I said in my reply to Suresh, they are good ‘time-pass’ and can never replace serious literature. This can be relaxed for children who are just beginning to read. Your what, which, when and how much sounds great. But control can sometimes go awry as it had in my case.

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      1. grondmaster · · Reply

        Sorry for butting in – again – but I beg to differ. Serious comic writing – Graphic Novels or even serialized monthly magazines – are pretty serious business for everyone involved – the writers and the artists, the readers, and the publishers. The writers are worshipped as gods – check out the names Will Eisner, Stan Lee or Jack Kirby – these are people who’ve revolutionized comics. Comics are a bigger deal for a lot of people than verse books can ever be. Literature fests get maybe 10% of the audiences that comics conventions get. It’s just that in India, currently, comics released have predominantly belonged to the children’s genre hence the whole mistaken idea exists.

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        1. You are most welcome to butt in any number of times, HArshal, for you bring something to the blog with your comments and help me expand my knowledge of the subject I have written about. Alas, I have also read only the comics released for children in our country and so my exposure to the authors you have mentioned is nil. The next book I buy is going to be a graphic novel by one of the authors you have mentioned, for sure 🙂
          by

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  14. There is nothing wrong in reading comics.It leaves a nice “taste” after reading one.
    Recently,on a flight,a woman in her mid 40s sitting in the same row with me was busy reading comics

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    1. You know, often adults feel a little hesitant to read comics in public for fear of being judged, I guess. But it is perfectly ok if you ask me. I agree with your ‘after taste’ comment. Of course the comic needs to be good for that to happen 🙂

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  15. My Dad’s 67 and he STILL loves reading comics..but again, he reads anything and everything, including the cover of the maggi packet with interest 🙂

    but yes, I have never felt comics have their negative…I always feel any kind of reading is for pleasure..may be I always read the right comics, Tintin, Asterix, Calvin n Hobbes, Tinkle,…I love love love reading comics and yep, Jughead included 🙂

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    1. You are right.Any reading is only for the pleasure of it. So I don’t look down upon comics — for children or for adults. Your dad is just like mine had been — he would read the newspaper wrappings of the grocery too!

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  16. Comics can be addictive in early years but they are able to ignite the flame of imagination in growing years. I too did a post sometime back on the same and you may read if you like here http://rahulsblogandcollections.blogspot.in/2014/04/the-world-of-comics.html

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    1. Read your post and put a comment too 🙂 You have given a nice round-up of the comic book scene. They are certainly addictive. Recently a young relative who came to our house didn’t even come for lunch begging to finish that last comic before she did!

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  17. I still enjoy comics, and kiddo loves them! Unfortunately, as you say, he gets carried away too, sometimes, which worries me. And then there is the issue of language. Left to him, that’s what he would write too, even for stories in school! And like you, I pester him continually too, nagging him to read other books. Incidentally, I can say the same about the recent books in the teenage or pre-teens fiction category. More slang is used and there is a huge amount of violence to 😦 but well, at least he reads. And is also learning to see the differences in writing of authors and genres so I guess there is hope yet 😛 and hey, chotta bheem books are already around. Mostly picture books and comics too. And remember the ganesha and ghatotkach movies? Comics were released on them too. And we had them too!

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    1. Since Samhit is also interested in books and even getting to be discerning in his choice of them, let him alone when he gets carried away by the comics. As I have said in the post, I still have to get over my misplaced sense of parenting for giving away his comics. I’d not want another parent to go through those guilt pangs. Thanks for the CB info. I have updated the post 🙂 I sometimes wonder which is better, reading the comic book after seeing the video version or the other way round/ You could perhaps tell me?

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      1. grondmaster · · Reply

        “Never judge a book by its movie” – J.W. Eagan. Ditto vice versa? But yes, the CB book versions are much better than the TV series (or perhaps I’m coloured by the abysmal quality of the animation) whereas I have seen movie versions both much better and much worse than the books.

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      2. hmm… that is debatable, Zephyr. i would much rather read the book first, though samhith prefers the movies before the book. while that does work sometimes. for eg he saw one of the percy jackson movies and got interested in the books, and has now read all of them!! and he enjoyed the harry potter movies,but as for the books, he has only got through the first three and prefers the movies to the books, which is something i dont think we shall ever agree on!!!!

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        1. I prefer books any day to the movie version. Many a time I have been impelled to read the book after watching the movie. Cry,the beloved country, was one such movie. And the movies have always but always disappointed me vis-a-vis the book. But going from comics to the book version of the same story is more relevant. The comic book has to be really good to make one get interested enough in the story to want to read it in detail.

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  18. Hello Zephyr!

    Comics have evolved quite a bit from the days I read Tarzan, Phantom and Amar Chitra Katha, I think. There was Archie’s too.. I can honestly say that I got most of my Hindu mythology fix from Amar Chitra Katha when I was a kid. I don’t know how things are in comics land these days for kids.. From what little I’ve seen, the quality of English has deteriorated in the Indian ones. (I could be wrong as my sample space is really small).

    I get the sense that reading as a habit is on the wane among kids now. Reading is competing with gaming and losing the battle. If comics are the way to get kids to read, I’d be all for it considering the alternative of nothing, I guess.

    Interesting choice of topic, Zephyr. Enjoyed this one!

    Srini

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    1. You are right — about the quality of language going from bad to worse. As anu has pointed out, even books for pre-teens and teens is replete with slang and bad English. But as you say, they are better than nothing. However, committed readers are still able to inspire their children to pick up that book or even comic book. ACK are the best way even for someone like me to get clued in on the stories from our epics and myths 🙂 They seem to have covered the lot.

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    2. Actually Srini, I see some very avid readers among children today. And the variety that they read is mind boggling plus they have better access to books today. I do, however, tend to agree that the standard of English has certainly fallen. I remember subscribing to Champak for my elder son as I liked the comics when I was young. But it is atrociously bad now with very poor language :(. I was so disappointed.

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  19. Not a comics person. I read some here and there, but they didn’t entertain me as much as a book did. I would feel the comics very distracting to the eye. In a book, I could visualise the settings, the background and the characters as if it is really happening; which I do even till date 🙂

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    1. I understand perfectly how you feel about comics and books. I share your views too, but I like both — for different reasons. As for children, they are very good to make them interested in the written word since they learn to read faster with them. Does Amu like reading? If not, time to introduce them to her.

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      1. yeah, she is lot better than Rushi. She is reading Dr.Suess now. But not stable…I hope she continues..I read to her once in a while, have to make it more regular.

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        1. You do that. I am sure she will soon begin reading.

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  20. I read only Tinkle and Chandamama, that too very few editions. My dad brought a Tin Tin but I didn’t like it much. Don’t know why, I was not attracted by comics as much as I was attracted to books, later on.

    Destination Infinity

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    1. Didn’t I say at the outset of the post that there is no ambiguity with regard to comics? You must have been on of those who didn’t like them. But I feelthat they are good to read when one is looking to pass the time without straining one’s brain. Also some of them are really good. Even I didn’t much like Tin Tin. Probably to do with its racial tilt and atrocious names given to Indian characters 🙂

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  21. Er… Re: Chhota Bheem… Over 100 books are out, mostly large picture books.

    And I don’t see any harm in getting to read age appropriate comics. They are a brilliant tool for showing many themes that would be difficult to show in normal verse, even large picture books. Remember the Sufi Comics book I sent you? Many of the stories there would be quite bland in plain verse.

    I still go to Landmark & Crossword, and if I have time, I steer myself to the Amar Chitra Katha section – they do good marketing and hence occupy whole shelves and more – and lose myself for an hour or so, coming up for a breather very rarely.

    As a child, I remember tying a favoured pink towel as a cape and long jumping off my bed, hands outstretched, trying to emulate Superman. I always knew it wouldn’t happen: After all, he was *Superman* who could fly, and I, a simple eight year old from a Bombay suburban family. But who’s stopping me from making those fantasies? Oh well.

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    1. Thanks Harshal for the update on Chota Bheem.I have updated the post. This is one of the reasons why I love the commenters on my blog. They point out my mistakes and help me learn about the topic 🙂

      Do you think Tinkle is age-appropriate for me? 😀 Comics are comics are comics. The age factor only comes in the case of very young children for whom some concepts, or ideas might not be suitable for their age. For the rest, an Amar Chitra Katha is ageless — for the comic book as well as the reader. See, your Superman experiment proves some of the fears about comics! you just jumped from the bed, but many kids did out of their windows with disastrous results. And unlike your pragmatic self, they had no idea that they couldn’t 😦

      I didn’t know that Landmark and Crossword allowed one to ‘browse’ for an hour with a comic book in hand 🙂 I should try it out sometime.

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      1. grondmaster · · Reply

        Age appropriateness is a one-way street. Once you’re old enough to read a comic, it’ll always be appropriate for you, no matter how early it became appropriate for you.

        I wouldn’t mind a kid – 12-13 or younger – reading a Tinkle or a Lucky Luke or a Tom & Jerry. Perhaps not Archie, at least for a couple of years more. A Dark Knight or a Watchmen would make an entry by 16 or later. That’s what I meant by age-appropriate comics.

        Landmark & Crossword aren’t too keen on throwing you out. They let you sit, provide you with cushions, sofas, settees, so that you can read at peace. Nobody really bothers you unless you’re actively spoiling a book and making it so bad it can’t be sold.

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        1. That is what I meant too, only I didn’t know the names of the comic book heroes 😀 Fortunately a lot of parents, including me, went for the safe and informative ACK comics.

          It is good to know that these book stores allow reading and I guess a good reader wouldn’t maul the books and I am sure they can spot someone who would.

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  22. chsuresh63 · · Reply

    I am the guy who started off on regular AND non-child fiction books right off. Did not take to comics since I never was interested in the pics and the reading material did not last more than 15 mins 🙂 I wanted more of a bang for my library card then and I want more bang for my buck now. I do enjoy comics now – provided someone else bought it and left it for me to read 🙂

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    1. Did I say anything about buying comics? 😛 I’d think twice about picking up even a Tinkle today 🙂 Yes, I am a cheapo that way! But I think investing in Asterix or Calvin and Hobbs (the younger one has bought them) is not too bad since they can be collectors’ items. I guess comics are good for time-pass, as we Indians say 🙂 Me, I loved both the Phantom/Mandrake comics and the heavy classics equally when I was eight and still do, though I read more non-fiction these days in place of classics.

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